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Posts tagged painting

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"Poverty Is Not Economics," by John Kofi Aryee, 2006 :: via Koranteng's art collection
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from "Weighing Andrew Wyeth," by Terry Teachout, WSJ.com, 17 January 2009

Andrew Wyeth's painting Benjamin's House

I suspect that once the shouting dies down, Wyeth’s oeuvre will undergo at least a partial revaluation, and that it will center on his watercolors. Like so many other American artists who came to prominence between the end of the 19th century and the emergence of Abstract Expressionism, Wyeth profited greatly from the immediacy of watercolor, an on-the-spot medium that does not allow for second thoughts: What you paint is what you get. It forced him to be free. To look at a watercolor like “Benjamin’s House,” which hangs in San Francisco’s de Young Museum, is to see what Wyeth meant when he claimed that “I honestly consider myself to be an abstractionist.” All narrative content has been stripped out of this bare, washy winter scene, leaving only the essentials: a wall, a window, a handful of branches. The result is a masterly little glimpse of the visible world, executed with self-effacing virtuosity.

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Jacob's Dream (detail), by José de Ribera, oil on canvas, Museo Nacional del Prado, :: via The Guardian
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"My Money, My Currency," by Hanna von Goeler :: via Monoscope
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photo by Eliot Elisofon, 1952 :: via The Best of LIFE
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"Ontbijtje," gouache on paper, by Robert Amesbury, from the 2007 show "Pronk" at the Bernard Toale Gallery, Boston, Bernard Toale Gallery
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"Remember (I was torn between)" 2008, collage, acrylic and resin on wood panel, by Jay Kelly :: via DailyServing.com
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The Tower of Babel is a vision of architecture as anthill madness. As the British Museum’s exhibition Babylon: Myth and Reality reveals, Brueghel is not the only artist driven to imagine this fabulous building. Towers of Babel proliferate in this show, be they painted with miniaturist precision or exploding in apocalyptic doom; there’s even one made of shoes, in a 2001 painting by Michael Lassel. Martin van Heemskerk’s, however, is square, in keeping with old sources he studied, but his attempt to visualise what the tower was “really” like does not stop him showing its top smashed apart by divine lightning. In an anonymous Dutch painting—one of a series that riff on Brueghel—the city that surrounds the tower is on fire, the summit of the hubristic edifice menaced by an eerie light coming through the storm clouds. Perhaps the strangest is by Athanasius Kircher, a 17th-century scholar whose light, airy spiral looks prophetically modern, like a blueprint for a skyscraper.

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"Slides," painting by Kirsten Tradowsky, 2007 :: via New American Paintings
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from "Annals of Culture: Late Bloomers," by Malcom Gladwell, The New Yorker, 20 October 2008

But for Zola, Cézanne would have remained an unhappy banker’s son in Provence; but for Pissarro, he would never have learned how to paint; but for Vollard (at the urging of Pissarro, Renoir, Degas, and Monet), his canvases would have rotted away in some attic; and, but for his father, Cézanne’s long apprenticeship would have been a financial impossibility. That is an extraordinary list of patrons. The first three—Zola, Pissarro, and Vollard—would have been famous even if Cézanne never existed, and the fourth was an unusually gifted entrepreneur who left Cézanne four hundred thousand francs when he died. Cézanne didn’t just have help. He had a dream team in his corner.

This is the final lesson of the late bloomer: his or her success is highly contingent on the efforts of others.

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photo by Flickr user Wonderlane, 21 July, 2005 :: via Intelligent Travel
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Promo for "This American Life with Ira Glass," 5 April 2007
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A page from the "Nepal Horse Book," date unspecified, from the Oriental art collection of Copenhagen's Royal Library :: via BibliOdyssey
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from "Jean de Brunhoff's Histoire de Babar Maquette," pp. 20-21, The Morgan Library & Museum Online Exhibitions :: via The New Yorker
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"Dream City" (1921), watercolor and oil, by Paul Klee, in a private collection, Turin, Italy :: via more than 95 theses
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AP Photo by Karim Kadim, from "Scenes from Iraq," The Big Picture, 3 September 2008
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"Portrait of Andries Stilte II" (2006), oil on canvas, 96 x 72 in., by Kehinde Wiley, at the Columbus Museum of Art
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photo by Jacob Antonio Jr., from the article "Los Angeles thwarts family in fight over graffiti," by Steve Lopez, Los Angeles Times, 13 August 2008
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detail from The Lacemaker, by Johannes Vermeer (oil on canvas, c.1670), The Louvre, Paris
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